UNSPOKEN QUESTIONS
Overview

The Unspoken Questions source method is a way to make sense of the wider context of a situation through exploring it more deeply and widely by asking the questions that often remain unasked.

Concept

The Unspoken Questions concept is based on the natural human behaviour of trying to avoid tension and potential conflict by not asking any questions that may seem awkward or uncomfortable. The questions that are not being asked are often the keys to unlocking progress in a situation that seems stuck and moving it forward. Rather than asking questions in a confrontational and judgmental manner, the Unspoken Questions method uses a gentle and powerful approach to working with uncertainty and complexity. By inviting people to ask the questions that normally remain unspoken capabilities can be affirmed and new opportunities can be opened up.

Purpose

The purpose of Unspoken Questions is to clearly identify tensions, uncertainties and ambiguities that are being avoided as there is a perception that, if asked, they may generate further tension, uncertainty and ambiguity. By using a safe and structured approach, the Unspoken Questions can be used to resolve tensions, to use uncertainty to advantage and work with ambiguity. Working with the Unspoken Questions method also helps people to reduce tension levels and help create a psychologically safe environment. The ability to ask questions that may have once appeared difficult also increases levels of confidence and engagement.

Uses
  • To clearly identify tensions, uncertainties and ambiguities in a situation
  • To surface tensions, uncertainties and ambiguities
  • To develop a psychologically safe environment
  • To resolve challenging tensions
  • To work with ambiguity
  • To find opportunity in uncertainty and create value from it
  • To reduce tension levels
  • To develop levels of individual confidence
  • To increase levels of engagement

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